Number Of Brazilians Defining Themselves As Black Has Increased By 32% In 6 Years

AFRICANGLOBE – From 2012 to 2018, the number of people declaring themselves pretos, meaning Blacks, increased by almost 5 million in the country. The população branca (white population) continues to shrink and pardos(browns) continue to be majority.

In 2018, Brazil had 19.2 million people who declared themselves Black – 4.7 million more than in 2012, which corresponds to a 32.2% increase in the period. This is revealed by a survey released on Wednesday (22) by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE).

With the exception of 2014, when the number of blacks remained stable in relation to the previous year, the percentage of the declared black population has increased annually. It is therefore a trend.

“The specific reason for the increase of this declaration, in fact, we don’t have. (see note one) What we realize is that in recent years there has been reinforcement of affirmative policies of color or race,” said the IBGE analyst.

The researcher emphasized that the survey, based on the Continuous National Household Sample Survey (PNAD), is conducted based on the interviewee’s perception of color and race. “It is not the interviewer who determines the color, it is the informant who declares,” said the IBGE rep. (see note one)

On the other hand, the declared white population is declining year to year, which in 2018 totaled 89.7 million Brazilians, against 92.2 million in 2012. The whites were majority in the country until 2014. Since 2015, pardos have accounted for the majority of the population – jumping from 89.6 million in 2012 to 96.7 million in 2018.

“In addition to the possible change in the population’s perception of color and race resulting from affirmative policies, we have to consider the process of miscegenation in the country, which causes us to have a higher percentage of pardos,” said the researcher.

Percentage division (%) of the Brazilian population by color or race

Since 2015, pardos have been the majority in the country.

Brancos (Whites): 43.1 Pardos (Browns): 46.5 Pretos (Blacks): 9.3

Source: IBGE

Asked if such a trend – of increasing black and brown populations and decreasing white – will continue, the researcher said it is not possible to state.

“We don’t know if all this growth is based on affirmative color and race policies. If it is, it will depend on the continuity of these policies. A culture is created in people who have been affected by these policies and they pass on their position in relation to their own color to other people, even if they are not directly benefited,” said the researcher.

A Politician was killed Rio De Janeiro,2 Ex- Cops In Custody 3/13/2019

Politician assassinated in Rio

Maine: things are getting real bad in south America when you have two cops,possibly!!!! Target politicians for assassination.Well, that is what happened in South America in Rio De Janeiro. This woman was an activist for Afro south American’s rights and a fighter for the LGBT community and two cops allegedly killed her,let’s find out why!!!!

The police have arrested two former police officers tuesday in the murder of a Rio de Janeiro councilwoman Marielle Franco and her driver,The murder shock south America and lead to many protest. It also shocked many countrries.Even though many has been questioned about the murder of Franco a prominent activist for Afro-Brazilian and LGBT rights.

“Its was a crime against a lawmaker, a woman, exercising her democratic function who had her life taken away in an unacceptable , criminal way,” Rio de Janeiro state Gov. Wilson Witzel told reporters

Franco protesting giving hope

Maine : Its seems that the more i look at south America and the people down there i never seen so much corruption like what iam seeing since my time covering Africa. Assassinations,starvations, you name it the works!!! I did a story about Venezuela and the people eating out of the trash trying to fine food. How that country turn to socialism and now they got the civilian starving to death.

While Witzel praised police and investigators for the arrest,the case send a massive message that there is deep corruption in Brazil’s police force,including connections to the Military and paramilitary groups that controls a large part of the state

The suspects were id as Ronnie Lessa, 48, a retired military police officer, and Elcio Viera de Queiro,46, who was fired from his job in 2015 . The law reject both parties involvement of the shooting

Lessa was arrested near the same rio condominium complex where president Jairo Bolsonaro has his hom, Police said

Maine:Its seems that Brazil is having problems and south America it self is braking down with corruption i will keep track of this story as it continues but as an African American we should pay more attention to our brothers and sisters in Brazil and south America we hav alot of them down there . i hope the arrest the people that killed this woman because in a civilization we only can be civil

In Addition: The people that murdered this woman and activist stood out side a meeting she attended and waited for two hours and killed her on the spot. it is a sad day in Brazil where you freedom cannot be freely be displayed and fighting for people that don’t have a voice can get you murdered!!!! if stuff like this prossit in countries like Brazil how can you have order?

INCEDENT SPARK BLACK LIVE MATTER MOVEMENT IN BRAZIL

The killing of a Black teenager in Brazil, which has a long history of police violence against Afro-Brazilians, sparked a movement to protect Black lives. This comes against the backdrop of a new law-and-order Brazilian president coming to power with an anti-Black agenda.

Killing Of Black Teen In Brazil Ignites BLM Movement To End Police Brutality 2/21/2019

Many are comparing Pedro Gonzaga in Brazil to Eric Garner.

The killing of a Black teenager in Brazil, which has a long history of police violence against Afro-Brazilians, sparked a movement to protect Black lives. This comes against the backdrop of a new law-and-order Brazilian president coming to power with an anti-Black agenda.

Demonstrators rallied in five major cities in Brazil after the death on Feb. 14 of 19-year-old Pedro Gonzaga whom a supermarket security guard choked—fueling a Black Lives Matter movement, the Guardian reported.

It’s unclear exactly what led to the confrontation. The security guard reportedly used a sleeper hold on Gonzaga, who died of a heart attack at a hospital. A video showed at least one bystander pleading with the security guard to stop. “He is suffocating him,” a woman is heard saying on a video of the incident. Gonzaga was taken unconscious to the hospital.

Parallels to Eric Garner, the unarmed African-American man who died after a New York City cop used a chokehold to arrest him, were widely noted by the demonstrators.

“There has never been a Black Lives Matter [movement] in Brazil to compare to the United States, but this year I think it will happen more often because the black community is more and more united,” Rene Silva, a protest organizer in Rio, said.

In July 2018, Amnesty International, a global human rights organization, noted that police killings of Black youths in Brazil continue 25 years after the infamous Candelária massacre, in which eight young boys were killed by off-duty police officers in Rio de Janeiro. The incident sparked international outrage, yet little has changed more than two decades later.

“The struggle to protect Black Brazilian youths from police violence and deliver justice for the victims of the past remains as vital and relevant as ever,” Amnesty International said.

Unfortunately, things seem unlikely to change any time soon. In January, far-right politician Jair Bolsonaro, who was once on trial for racism, was sworn in as Brazil’s president. He has a long history of making hateful comments about women, the LGBT community and Afro-Brazilians.

In April 2018, Brazil’s attorney general charged him with inciting hatred and discrimination. In one instance, Bolsonaro insulted Black descendants of rebel African slaves called quilombolas and expressed regret about their legal protections. However, a court dismissed the lawsuit during his presidential campaign in September.

Before taking office, Bolsonaro signaled one of his policy targets: Brazil’s affirmative action program, according to Bloomberg News.