President Trump says ‘I hereby order’ US companies to stop doing business with China

Trump’s concerns about China is well founded and some kind of action has to be done about China stealing products and copying them and branding in with another copy by stealing its design and the way the product works a product that was intellectually by companies in the United states that is a bad thing But totally stop doing business with China is another.

I do agree that China have been shipping dangerous products for years that got babies sick as well as product that broke easy once you braught them and much much more. China have been making millions even billions shipping these kind of products to the United States for a very very long time . But stop doing Business with China is not a good idea.

If iam not mistaken alot of our business move over to china do to the fact the America raise the taxes on big business and that is why they moved. Even though these business moved like heavy industry like car manufactures and many other business move to China during the taxes was raised on big business during the Bush and Obama’s Administration. These business still do business with America by shipping there products to America from where they are in China.

China is not to be trusted but there is to much to lose there it is to gain to totally cut of china. the terufs are a good idea bit i do believe cutting of China totally can lead to other ills

ICYMI, Ben Carson On Trump’s ‘Go Back’ Tweets: ‘He’s Not Racist At All’

When the deplorable secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Ben Carson, was asked about Trump’s racist “go back” Tweets targeted at Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, he had his classic response. Carson said Trump isn’t racist “at all.”

See Also: Ilhan Omar Reacts To Meghan McCain’s White Tears

While talking on “Sunday Morning Futures,” Carson said,  “He is not racist at all.” He then added, “He lived in New York. Jesse Jackson gave him an award for the incredible things that he had done in the African​-American community. I have never seen anything that even resembles racism.”

The New York Post pointed out, “It’s unclear what award Carson is referring to, but Trump did donate office space to Jackson’s Rainbow/Push Coalition at his 40 Wall Street building that garnered praise from the civil rights leader at the time.”

On July 14, Trump tweeted, “So interesting to see “Progressive” Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly……” He continued, “Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.” All three of them are all from American and Omar is originally from Somali.

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump · Jul 14, 2019

So interesting to see “Progressive” Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly……

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump

….and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run. Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how….187K7:27 AM – Jul 14, 2019Twitter Ads info and privacy72.2K people are talking about this

This clearly isn’t shocking from Carson. He is the same man who wants to kick out 55,000 American children from public housing. Earlier this month, ABC News asked about how he is enforcing a law to kick families out of public housing if one person lives in their home illegally, “Because it’s the law. We’re a nation of laws and if the lawmakers don’t like it, they need to change it.”

However, Carson selectively uses the excuse of the law.

According to Politico, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) has determined Carson broke the law by buying a $31,000 dining room set for his office and $8,000 dishwasher in the office kitchen. “Agencies are required to notify Congress of expenditures over $5,000 to furnish an executive’s office,” Politico wrote last month.

Looks like Trump and Carson were made for each other.

Senate Republicans revolt against Trump over border 3/14/2019

Rebel members of President Donald Trump’s party have helped pass a vote to reject his declaration of an emergency on the US-Mexico border.

Twelve Republican senators broke party ranks to side with Democrats, approving a proposal to revoke the proclamation by 59-41.

The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives last month backed the measure.

Following Thursday’s vote, Mr Trump tweeted: “VETO!”

Congress needs a two-thirds majority of both chambers to override a presidential veto, which is viewed as unlikely in this case.

Nevertheless, the vote will be seen as an embarrassing loss for the president on his signature domestic issue.

On Twitter, Mr Trump slammed the vote, calling it a “Democrat inspired Resolution which would OPEN BORDERS while increasing Crime, Drugs and Trafficking in our Country”.

It comes just a day after the Senate rebuked him on foreign policy by approving a bill to end US support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen.

The Republican rebels on Thursday were Mitt Romney and Mike Lee of Utah, Marco Rubio of Florida, Roy Blunt of Missouri, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Rob Portman of Ohio, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Rand Paul of Kentucky, and Roger Wicker of Mississippi.

Thom Tillis of North Carolina changed his mind minutes before the vote and said he would oppose it.

The Republican president declared the emergency on 15 February after Congress refused funding for a wall on the US-Mexico border, a key campaign pledge.

He aims to circumvent Congress and build his long-promised barrier by raiding military budgets.

It could free up almost $8bn (£6bn) for the wall, which is still considerably short of the estimated $23bn cost of a barrier along almost 2,000 miles (3,200km) of border, but far more than the nearly $1.4bn begrudgingly allotted last month by Congress.

Earlier on Thursday Mr Trump called Democrats “border deniers” and said any Republican opposing him would be casting “a vote for Nancy Pelosi”.

He says the barrier is needed to combat illegal immigration on the southern border which he has described as a “crisis”.

Democrats say the declaration is unconstitutional, Mr Trump has manufactured the border emergency and a wall would be a boondoggle.

The resolution to revoke the declaration passed the House by a margin of 245-182 in February. Thirteen Republicans sided with Democrats.

Lawmakers used a provision from the National Emergencies Act to overrule the president.

Most Republicans supported Mr Trump’s decision and accused Democrats of ignoring an emergency at the border.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the declaration is “the predictable and understandable consequences of Democrats’ decision to put partisan obstruction ahead of the national interest”.

What did the rebel Republicans say?

The renegade conservatives largely condemned Mr Trump’s declaration for setting up a dangerous presidential precedent while still agreeing with his border policies.

“This issue is not about strengthening our border security, a goal that I support and have voted to advance,” Mrs Collins said ahead of the vote.

“It is a solemn occasion involving whether or not this body will stand up for its institutional prerogatives and will support the separation of powers enshrined in our constitution.”

Mr Paul agreed Congress must fund border security, “but no president should go around Congress”.

He added that if the declaration stands, it could allow a future “socialist-inclined president” to pass environmental or gun control legislation.

Mr Romney echoed a similar sentiment, calling the use of an emergency an “overreach” that “is an invitation to further expansion and abuse by future presidents”.

Trump Advocates Death Penalty For Drugs Dealers 2/21/2019

Drug dealers kill people, destroy families and might deserve the death penalty or life in prison for their crimes, President Trump says.

Trump, speaking at a rally Saturday in Pennsylvania for congressional candidate Rick Saccone, said he got the idea from the leaders of China and Singapore. The U.S. criminal justice system, Trump said, is too soft on drugs.

“You kill 5,000 people with drugs because you’re smuggling them in and you are making a lot of money and people are dying. And they don’t even put you in jail,” Trump said. “That’s why we have a problem, folks. I don’t think we should play games.”

Trump said he recently asked the president of Singapore if that country has a drug problem.

“He said ‘We have a zero tolerance policy. That means if we catch a drug dealer, death penalty,'” Trump said.

More: Trump stumps for GOP candidate in Pennsylvania: ‘We have to win’

More: Will Trump be ready for North Korea meeting?

More: This week in Trump: The full Nunberg, porn star lawsuit and North Korea

Trump said he wasn’t sure whether the nation would be accepting of such a harsh penalty. But he said drug dealers destroy families.

“We can’t just keep setting up blue ribbon committees” that do nothing but “talk, talk, talk,” Trump said.

Trump has floated the idea before. Less than two weeks ago, Trump suggested “very strong” penalties to help address the nation’s growing problem with opioid addiction.

“Some countries have a very, very tough penalty — the ultimate penalty,” Trump said. “And, by the way, they have much less of a drug problem than we do.”

Last May, Trump congratulated Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte for a “great job” in his crackdown on drugs. Duterte has boasted about personally shooting and killing at least three crime suspects. Human rights groups and the United Nations have condemned Duterte’s vigilante-style campaign that has left thousands of suspected drug dealers and users dead.

Trump acknowledged Saturday that his idea might have dissenters.

“Probably you’ll have some people who say ‘Oh, that’s not nice,” Trump said. “But we have to do something.”

Trump declares national emergency to unlock border wall funds

Trump aims to tap over $6.5 billion using techniques that are sure to invite legal challenges.

President Donald Trump on Friday declared a state of emergency on the southern border and immediately directed $8 billion to construct or repair as many as 234 miles of a border barrier.

The move — which Trump acknowledged is sure to invite vigorous legal challenges from activists and government officials — comes after Trump failed to get the $5.7 billion he was seeking from lawmakers. Instead, Trump agreed to sign a congressional funding deal that included just $1.375 for border security, an amount he claimed as a victory but said was still “not enough.”

In addition to the funds Congress has appropriated, the White House will seek to redirect $3.6 billion from a military construction fund, $600 million from a Treasury Department drug forfeiture fund and $2.5 billion from a Pentagon drug prevention program, acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told reporters Friday.

From the White House’s Rose Garden Friday, Trump said he had to make the move because there was “an invasion of our country with drugs, with human traffickers, all types of criminals and gangs.”

And he lambasted congressional leaders for failing to get him the money he wanted, taking a thinly veiled shot at recently retired House Speaker Paul Ryan, saying people in Congress “should have stepped up.”

“It would have been easy,” Trump said over the course of nearly an hour of remarks followed by a question and answer session. “Not that easy, but it would have been a lot easier. Some people didn’t step up. We are stepping up now.”

The national emergency declaration is being used to tap the largest pot of money — the $3.6 billion earmarked for military construction. The White House is relying on other legal authorities to justify redirections of the other financial resources.

“It’s an all-of-the-above approach,” said a person close to the White House. “He always knew Congress was never going to give him the money he needed.”

But even as Trump made the border announcement on Friday, he focused much of his remarks on other areas he considers clear victories — trade negotiations, the economy and his efforts to denuclearize North Korea. Before even officially announcing the anticipated declaration, Trump took a winding path through the other topics for about 15 minutes.

Still, the border wall strategy is sure to appease his conservative base, which has been clamoring from Trump to win the border security funding he has vowed to obtain.

As expected, congressional Democrats announced they would immediately challenge the move on an array of fronts.

“The President’s actions clearly violate the Congress’s exclusive power of the purse, which our Founders enshrined in the Constitution,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said in a statement. “The Congress will defend our constitutional authorities in the Congress, in the Courts, and in the public, using every remedy available.”

The Democratic House is likely to pass a resolution of disapproval to block Trump’s move, which can be brought to the Senate floor and passed by a simple majority under procedural rules. If four Senate Republicans join all Democrats, the measure would be sent to Trump, who would be forced to issue a veto.

Lawmakers are also likely to launch a legal challenge to try and block the move.

The president on Friday said he was aware his emergency declaration will face a court fight, predicting that the matter could go all the way to the Supreme Court. But he forecast ultimate victory, citing the legal battle his administration waged over a travel ban for people from certain Muslim-majority countries. The administration was eventually able to get a third version through the courts after two other attempts were blocked.

“We will then be sued,” Trump said Friday. “And we will possibly get a bad ruling, and then we will get another bad ruling, and then we will end up in the Supreme Court and hopefully we will get a fair shake and win in the Supreme Court, just like the ban.

While Trump’s conservative base is largely supportive of Trump’s emergency declaration, numerous Republicans on Capitol Hill have been privately and publicly urging Trump to avoid such a step, fearful that use of such powers could propel a future Democratic president to take the same step on climate change or gun violence.

Even inside the White House, several aides have worried that a national emergency declaration would set a dangerous precedent — but Mulvaney pushed back against that notion.

“It actually creates zero precedent,” Mulvaney insisted on Friday in a call with reporters. “This is authority given to the president under law already.”

The funds Trump will get from Congress are part of a $328 billion spending billthat lawmakers swiftly passed Thursday to avoid a federal government shutdown before a midnight Friday deadline. The package’s $1.375 billion for border security will go towards 55 miles of physical barrier along the southern border in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

White House staffers held a conference call with supporters earlier Friday, telling them construction will begin in Texas and not California, where Trump will likely face a lawsuit from Democratic state leaders, according to someone familiar with the call.

A senior administration official told reporters that its ultimate goal is to repair or build barriers along at least 234 miles of the border.

“We are in the process to make sure that we can make those dollars go as far as they possibly can,” the official said. “And we expect that they will be able to go farther than 234 miles.”

Since 1976, presidents have declared 58 national emergencies. One was declared during the the Iraq war in 1990, and another was invoked after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in 2001.

Trump plans to travel to his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida later on Friday.